One of my favorite inventions is a pre-commit hook that auto runs test and lint commands from a makefile or package.json if they're found:

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#!/usr/bin/env bash

if [ -f "$PWD/makefile" ] && [ ! -z "$(cat $PWD/makefile | grep '^lint:')" ]; then
    echo "running make lint"
    make lint
elif [ -f "$PWD/package.json" ] && [ ! -z "$(cat $PWD/package.json | grep "^\"lint\":")" ]; then
    echo "running npm run lint"
    npm run lint
fi

if [ -f "$PWD/makefile" ] && [ ! -z "$(cat $PWD/makefile | grep '^test:')" ]; then
    echo "running make test"
    make test
elif [ -f "$PWD/package.json" ] && [ ! -z "$(cat $PWD/package.json | grep "^\"test\":")" ]; then
    echo "running npm run test"
    npm run test
fi

The /usr/bin/env bash piece ensures that the script has access to all of the environment variables you expect in your regular shell.

If the test or lint command fails then the git commit command fails. If I absolutely need to commit something in spite of the lint/test results I can do git commit --no-verify to skip the pre-commit hook.